Spyder, K-Way, Gall, A Cold Wall: a step forward

Whether it be an excursion in the middle of wild nature, or a walk throughout modern urban landscapes -with ever-increasing abrupt and extreme climate change-, the everlasting challenge with Nature is reconfirmed over and over again, bringing Men’s fashion to treasure new discoveries in the field of protective fabrics and gears.

For the Fall/Winter 2021/2022 season, Spyder bets on high-collared puffed jackets, tracksuits made of soft pile textiles – designed to keep the body warm in any extreme outdoor condition – jogging outfits, race sweaters and any kind of technical sportswear, accessories included, all marked by the arachnid logo almost like a tribe-belonging sign and declined into bright neon colours and graphic prints. The ultimate aim is to guarantee the highest performances, a field in which the brand – founded in 1978 by ski champion David Jacobs – has achieved the best innovations throughout the years. (Here is a formidable example: the Speedwire technology, on which Jacobs was granted a patent in 1994, it enhances race suit performance through a “trip wire” formed by a narrow seam on the surface of the legs and arms streamlined the surrounding airflow, significantly reducing wind drag by up to 40%, and has brought US Ski Team wearing it to capture gold, bronze and fifth place in world championships!)

K-WAY is also a big player in the field. Technological, functional and multi-colored, the French brand owned by BasicNet Group plays with high-technology textiles to conceive double-face puffer outerwear, military-inspired anorak suiting, minimalistic Montgomery coats and multi-pockets cargo pieces. The fil rouge of this collection stands in its signature three-colored tape (orange-yellow-blue) appearing on the linings, on the polo shirts, on the sweaters’ huge knitted cables, no less than on the zippers disseminated across the entire collection. Parkas and trousers are given a sportier fit by the drawstring, sophisticated tartan textures peep out from the inside of the jackets, in a harmonious blend of business and highly utility mood declined in the most unexpected creative paths.

Who could instead better imagine the armor of the future (or present?) than Gall? Provided with drawstrings placed in strategic positions, it conveys the idea of a complete protection gear in the principles of survival and adaptability. Oversize vests and futuristic helmets are rendered in hues that camouflage with Nature itself; pullover jackets expand themselves while trousers are provided with shrinking technicisms; detachable details go hand in hand with multi-sectioned, layering volumes.

A highly experimental imprint is what defines the British brand A Cold Wall. Plunging his creative roots in the English suburbs’ working class, the designer Samuel Ross upgrades workwear functionality through a contemporary feel and technical fabrics. The archetypal shell jacket as its base form is taken and reworked to produce minimalist, multi-use weatherproof jackets. Here the knitwear pieces are also certainly noteworthy: proposed in very tight ribs or provided with utility patch pockets, perforated in regular or irregular textures, they are expressions of incomparable avant-garde attitude.

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